Annals of Thoracic Medicine Official publication of the Saudi Thoracic Society, affiliated to King Saud University
 
Search Ahead of print Current Issue Archives Instructions Subscribe e-Alerts Login 
Home Email this article link Print this article Bookmark this page Decrease font size Default font size Increase font size
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 159-165

The optimal oral body temperature cutoff and other factors predictive of sepsis diagnosis in elderly patients


1 Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences; King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
3 King Abdullah International Medical Research Center; College of Public Health and Health Informatics, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Ashraf El-Metwally
King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, College of Public Health and Health Informatics, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Mail Code 2350, P.O. Box 3660, Riyadh 11481
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/atm.atm_52_22

Rights and Permissions

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to identify the optimal oral temperature cut-off value and other factors predictive of sepsis in elderly patients presenting to emergency department. METHODS: A hospital-based retrospective study was performed on all elderly patients who presented to the Adult Emergency Department at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh (January to December 31, 2018). RESULTS: Of total of 13,856 patients, 2170 (15.7%) were diagnosed with sepsis. The associated area under the curve estimate was 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72–0.74. Body temperature ≥37.3 was found as optimal cut-point with sensitivity = 50.97% and specificity = 87.22% and 82.39% of patients with sepsis will be correctly classified using this cut-off. An increase of 1° in body temperature was associated with an odds ratio of 9.95 (95% CI 8.95–11.06, P < 0.0001). Those aged ≥100 years having 11.12 (95% CI 2.29–20.88, P < 0.0001) times the likelihood for sepsis diagnosis compared with those aged 60–69 years. People admitted in weather such as winter, spring, or autumn were more likely to develop sepsis than people admitted in summer. CONCLUSION: The risk factors of sepsis such as age, temperature, and seasonal variation inform important evidence-based decisions. The hospitals dealing with sepsis patients should assess older patients for other severe illnesses or co-morbid that might lead to sepsis if left untreated. Therefore, older patients need to be prioritized over younger patients. The body temperature of patients admitted to hospitals needs to be monitored critically and it is important to consider seasonal fluctuations while managing cases of sepsis and allocating resources. Our findings suggest that clinicians should explore the possibility of sepsis in elderly patients admitted to emergency units with oral temperature ≥37.3°C. Risk factors for sepsis reported in this study could inform evidence-based decisions.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed442    
    Printed10    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded41    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal